Mark Brzezinski

Professor

3149 Marine Biotech
Dr. Brzezinski's research focuses on a dominant group of marine phytoplankton, the diatoms.

Deron Burkepile

Associate Professor

4312 Marine Science Institute
Marine ecology, community ecology, trophic interactions, coral reefs.

Craig Carlson

Professor

3147 Marine Biotech
Microbial oceanography, marine biogeochemistry, bacterioplankton dynamics, dissolved organic matter, carbon cycle.

Carla D'Antonio

Professor

4002 Bren Hall
Terrestrial plant community and ecosystem ecology, controls over vegetation change, feedbacks, restoration ecology.

Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez

Professor
Faculty Graduate Advisor
Diversity Program Officer

3151 Marine Biotech
Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez has worked for twenty years on diversity and function in marine phytoplankton combining molecular approaches, carbon physiology and biogeochemistry in the lab and in the field.

Armand Kuris

Professor

2002 Marine Biotech
Our laboratory is engaged in four interlocking areas of research. The underlying theory being developed in our lab concerns the nature of adaptive peaks for different types of trophic interactions (links in the food web; predator/prey, parasite/host).

Sally MacIntyre

Professor

4308 Marine Science Institute
Limnology and Coastal Oceanography, with particular emphasis on physical-biological coupling.

Douglas McCauley

Assistant Professor

2314 Marine Science Institute
Ecology; Conservation Science.

John M. Melack

Professor

4424 Bren Hall
Dr. Melack studies ecological processes in lakes, wetlands and streams and their catchments throughout the world.

Jonathan N. Pruitt

Associate Professor

2124 Noble Hall
Explores the ecological consequences of individual variation in behavior for individuals, populations, and communities.

Joshua Schimel

Professor

1108 Noble Hall
Soil and ecosystem ecology, microbial ecology, nutrient cycling, soil organic matter.

Lizzy Wilbanks

Assistant Professor

2128 Noble Hall
I am interested how microbial interactions and tightly-coupled biogeochemical cycles drive the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations, with a current focus on the bacteria and archaea of marine aggregates and biofilms.