Zoology

In EEMB zoological research is an organismal perspective, focusing on the animals themselves, in conjunction with their functional roles in fields such as evolution, physiology, behavior, and population and community ecology. Animals provide important model species for studies of ecological genetics, macroevolution, physiological ecology and behavioral ecology among many other fields. Their role in ecosystem functioning, disease ecology, and global change illuminates their importance in biology. While their basic biology forms a framework for study, their important roles in agriculture, fisheries and diseases lead many EEMB scientists to apply basic science to these and other important applications. Techniques to investigate zoological studies include population sampling in terrestrial and marine habitats, observational studies in nature, and experimental investigations of their physiology, behavior and other biological aspects. These “classical” fields are analyzed with a modern approach including molecular genetics, mathematical modeling, SCUBA, and GIS analyses among other methodologies.

A core element of zoological research in EEMB is our strong commitment to a teaching program including organism-based courses. These include fish biology, vertebrate natural history, parasitology, herpetology, and invertebrate biology. Integration of research and teaching provides a large cadre of faculty, graduate and undergraduate students with an exciting focus on the biology of animals.

Faculty

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Biological oceanography; ecology of marine gelatinous plankton; marine particulate matter and marine snow, biogeochemical cycling.

My research has mostly focused on how trophic interactions and productivity shape community organization across a variety of different ecosystems including coral reefs, rivers, tall grass prairies, and African savannas.

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A current focus of my research is to examine how disturbances (wildfire, floods) operating at different scales of time interact to affect top-down and bottom-up interactions in streams.

The Eliason Lab studies ecological and evolutionary physiology in fish. We are interested in the behavioral, physiological and biochemical processes that allow fish to thrive in their specific environmental conditions.

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Parasite population and community ecology; marine ecology; crustacean biology.

Understanding the ecology of communities and ecosystems in a rapidly changing world.

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Our lab addresses the question of how complex traits originate during evolution. We primarily study invertebrate visual systems and eyes, addressing questions like, when did a particular phenotype evolve? When did the components of that phenotype evolve? Where did those components come from? What evolutionary processes and mechanisms were involved?

Behavioral ecology, social organization, community ecology, eco-evolutionary dynamics.

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Molecular and genetic control of development in the nematode C. elegans; regulation of programmed cell death; mechanisms of tumorigenesis.

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Behavioral ecology; evolution; vertebrate biology; ornithology.

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Comparative biochemistry and physiology; energetics of animal locomotion; evolutionary design of functional capacities; ecological physiology.

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Evolutionary ecology, population and conservation biology; ecology and behavior of reef fishes.

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The Young lab seeks to understand how and when anthropogenic disturbances are likely to drive cascading changes in whole community structure and function, including implications for human health.