Marine Biology

Marine Biology encompasses the broad study of marine organisms, their behaviors, and their interactions with the environment. As the only major research university in the country located entirely on the ocean UCSB faculty are uniquely positioned to study the sea. EEMB faculty investigate aspects of marine biology that provide the basic understanding of ocean biota at the organismal, population and ecosystem level required to solve pressing marine issues related to human use and environmental change. Research on genetics and evolution provides critical insight into how environmental factors influence an organism’s physiology and behavior, and ultimately the ecological functions of marine ecosystems and the services that they provide. EEMB faculty develop the scientific understanding of ecology, evolution and genetics needed to address environmental issues ranging from changes in biodiversity and ecosystem function, to fisheries management, and the spread of invasive species, parasites and disease. EEMB offers a broad array of research in these areas ranging from microbial and organismal physiology to coral reef, coastal, deep sea, and open ocean ecology.

Faculty

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Biological oceanography; ecology of marine gelatinous plankton; marine particulate matter and marine snow, biogeochemical cycling.

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Phytoplankton ecology and physiology; phytoplankton cell cycles; elemental cycling in surface ocean.

My research has mostly focused on how trophic interactions and productivity shape community organization across a variety of different ecosystems including coral reefs, rivers, tall grass prairies, and African savannas.

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Dr. Carlson's research interests are shaped by an interdisciplinary blend of marine microbial ecology, microbiology and ocean biogeochemistry.

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Ecological physiology of invertebrates and fishes; biological oceanography; physiology of deep-sea animals; metabolic adaptations of hydrothermal vent animals; chemoautotrophic endosymbioses.

The Eliason Lab studies ecological and evolutionary physiology in fish. We are interested in the behavioral, physiological and biochemical processes that allow fish to thrive in their specific environmental conditions.

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Conservation biology, sustainable fisheries, climate change, biogeography, marine ecology, biostatistics.

Ecological physiology of marine organisms.

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Community ecology; marine vertebrate predation and competition.

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Marine biogeochemistry, ocean acidification, phytoplankton ecophysiology, marine calcification, inorganic carbon chemistry, genomics, shot-gun proteomics, genetic diversity.

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Parasite population and community ecology; marine ecology; crustacean biology.

Understanding the ecology of communities and ecosystems in a rapidly changing world.

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Our lab addresses the question of how complex traits originate during evolution. We primarily study invertebrate visual systems and eyes, addressing questions like, when did a particular phenotype evolve? When did the components of that phenotype evolve? Where did those components come from? What evolutionary processes and mechanisms were involved?

Behavioral ecology, social organization, community ecology, eco-evolutionary dynamics.

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Population and community ecology; applied ecology; consumer-resource interactions; marine invertebrates and reef fishes.

How to re-assemble resilient ecosystems and harness the ecological, economic, and cultural services they provide remains a fundamental yet unanswered question in ecology and conservation biology. My research program focuses on the recovery and assembly of disturbed and degraded ecosystems in the face of ongoing human impact. The following questions guide my current research: (1) How do ecosystems respond to disturbance?, (2) What drives the trajectory of ecosystem recovery? (3) What makes ecosystems resilient?

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Evolutionary ecology, population and conservation biology; ecology and behavior of reef fishes.