Botany

As plants dominate the net primary production on the planet, understanding fundamental plant processes is critical to our understanding of global ecology and evolutionary history. Our research group combines studies of the molecular and physiological bases of plant form, function and adaptation with studies of plant interactions with the biotic and abiotic environment. Our diverse faculty, with expertise in disciplines from the individual plant to the global biosphere, makes possible study of the integration of plant performance from molecular to the community and ecosystem scales and from the perspective of micro to macroevolution.

Specific areas of expertise include (1) genomic analysis of development and adaptations using the genus Aquilegia (Columbines), (2) evaluating factors influencing the evolution of life history and mating system using the genus Clarkia (fare-well-to-spring), (3) documenting plant phenological shifts in response to climate change, (4) evaluating plant traits allowing coexistence of native with non-native plant species, (5) evaluating biotic and abiotic controls over the success and impact of plant invaders and (6) evaluating the contribution of plant biomass (roots, litter, root exudates) to soil microbial activity, ecosystem N cycling and carbon storage.

Faculty

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Research in my lab elucidates mechanisms controlling plant dominance and the conditions under which non-native plants have short versus long term community and ecosystem impacts.

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Our laboratory studies the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation using genomic analyses and field-based studies in the genus Aquilegia (Columbines).

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Adaptive evolution within and among wild plant species, with a special interest in physiological performance, life history, phenology, floral traits, and mating system.

Research in the Oono Lab is focused on understanding how symbiotic associations evolve, particularly between plant hosts or communities and bacterial or fungal microbes.

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Soil ecology; microbial controls of ecosystem processes; terrestrial biogeochemistry.